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TACTICAL MEDICINE TACMED España

TACTICAL MEDICINE TACMED España
by EMS SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL

Facebook Dr. Ramon Reyes, MD

NIVEL DE ALERTA ANITERRORISTA, España

miércoles, 30 de agosto de 2017

TOURNIQUET TRAINING FOR ALL

TOURNIQUET TRAINING FOR ALL 



Oct. 22, 2013 7:47 p.m. ET
The school shooting in Newtown, Conn., and the Boston Marathon bombing are prompting medical experts to change their thinking about the long-disdained technique of using tourniquets to save lives.
Drawing on lessons from those attacks and battlefields in Afghanistan and Iraq, emergency-medicine doctors are recommending that rescue personnel carry tourniquets and be prepared to use them in mass-casualty events.
A tourniquet is a bandage or other device applied tightly to restrict blood flow and prevent a victim with an arm or leg wound from bleeding to death. For decades, many first-aid classes and doctors have taught that tourniquets were too dangerous to use, because prolonged loss of blood circulation can lead to loss of a limb.
Now, a group of surgeons is challenging that view, advocating tourniquet training not just for police officers but for teachers and others who work in public places.
"It's kind of a radical change in thinking, because for years we have been teaching that tourniquets should be the absolute last resort," said Peter Pons, associate medical director for the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians. In recent months, he has begun teaching tourniquet use to police officers in Denver, where he lives.
Studies have shown that tourniquets distributed to soldiers in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars helped save lives, Dr. Pons said. And researchers haven't found instances in which improper tourniquet use cost a soldier's limb, he added.
The risk of limb loss may have been overstated because it can take two hours or more for a tourniquet to damage a limb beyond repair, and it is unusual in the U.S. for someone suffering a life-threatening injury to take more than two hours to reach professional medical help, according to Dr. Pons and others.
The tourniquet's benefit, by contrast, comes in the initial minutes before medical personnel arrive. Shooting or bombing victims can bleed to death in five minutes.
Several doctors noted that the response at the Boston Marathon—where bystanders immediately used T-shirts and whatever else they had to make improvised tourniquets—shows that, in some ways, common sense among the public is ahead of current medical practice.
Lenworth Jacobs, a Connecticut doctor, said tourniquets wouldn't have prevented the deaths of children in last December's shootings in Newtown, because so many of the wounds were to vital organs. But tourniquets, he argued, would save lives in other cases, including the recent terror attack at a mall in Nairobi, Kenya.
After the Newtown shooting, Dr. Jacobs was among the medical experts asked by the American College of Surgeons and the Federal Bureau of Investigation to draft recommendations for the best way to respond to such events. Those recommendations, called the Hartford Consensus, included a call for wider use of tourniquets.
Some experts remain cautious about tourniquets. Jeffrey Pellegrino, a member of the American Red Cross Scientific Advisory Council, said in a statement that "the majority of bleeding incidents can be stopped by applying direct pressure to the wound. Because of the risk to the limb, lay responders who have been trained should only use a tourniquet as a last resort in cases where help is delayed, when bleeding cannot be controlled by direct pressure, or if applying direct pressure is not possible."
Alexander Eastman, a trauma surgeon who is a member of the Dallas Police Department's SWAT team, said tourniquets should be carried on first responders' uniforms. In his own job on a SWAT team, he often carries a pack with military-style tourniquets he can distribute to officers or victims.
At a recent police conference in Philadelphia, Dr. Eastman asked a crowd of major-city police chiefs whether they had been trained that tourniquets were too dangerous to use. Most raised their hands, he said.
"It's a myth that these tourniquets can hurt somebody, and we are fighting to end that myth," he said.

Military Emergency Tourniquet (MET) Gen III by H&H Medical

Military Emergency Tourniquet (MET) Gen III HH Medical



Military Emergency Tourniquet (MET) Gen III HH Medical


Military Emergency Tourniquet (MET) Gen III HH Medical

by Dr. Ramon Reyes, MD 

H&H Medical Corporation adds to our growing line of hemorrhage control products with one of the most rugged windlass tourniquets on the market, the Military Emergency Tourniquet - GEN III. Designed by formal special operations warfighters and proven in combat service for almost a decade, the MET GEN III is designed to be used in the most austere of environments.
The MET is a lightweight open-loop system composed of a sturdy strap and aluminum windlass. As a true open-loop system, this tourniquet comes apart completely to place around a limb and doesn’t need to be fully cinched down prior to engaging the windlass; even if loosely applied, by turning the windlass the slack will uptake and fully tighten the tourniquet. It has two securing points to lock down the windlass after application: one that is adjustable and one with Velcro.

The MET Gen III provides a one-handed application with a hardened aluminum windlass and tough 1000 Denier nylon to create a sturdy tourniquet that is easy to apply and stays in place.Military Emergency Tourniquet (MET) Gen III

R.A.T.S. Tourniquet Application

R.A.T.S. Tourniquet Application


R.A.T.S. Tourniquet Application



R.A.T.S. Tourniquet Application Video

R.A.T.S – Rapid Application Tourniquet – The fastest tourniquet on the market, and proven in combat.  The RATS uses a solid vulcanized rubber core with a nylon sheath, combined with a unique locking mechanism to make an incredibly fast tourniquet to apply to self or others.  No other tourniquet compares to the RATS when being used under stress in terms of time or ease of use.  
“U.S. Pat. No. 9,168,044”

R.A.T.S. Tourniquet Application

R.A.T.S. Tourniquet Application
Official web http://ratstourniquet.com/


TCCC 



Curso TECC España TACTICAL EMERGENCY CASUALTY CARE. TACMED Tactical Medicine

The Hartford Consensus IV Compendium. Bleeding Control for the Injured Course "Stop The Bleed" / Control de Sangrados para el Herido 


RevMedx PARABELT® Tourniquet Belt

RevMedx PARABELT® Tourniquet Belt


Tourniquet Belt




  • Daily-wear belt with integrated ratcheting tourniquet.
  • Simple, intuitive operation.
  • Compact, lightweight, and comfortable.
  • Mil-Spec components for durability and long life.
  • Ideal for first responders, law enforcement, outdoor enthusiasts, and concerned citizens. 


"The PARABELT is an innovative breakthrough in the
for military, law enforcement, ehas a built in ratcheting tourniquet
   system that is a critical life saving tool. Originally 
      designed for US Special Operations personell." 

Dr. Ramon Reyes Diaz, MD Wearing the RevMedx PARABELT® Tourniquet Belt
by @drramonreyesdiaz 



The PARABELT® by RevMedx, is a critical life saving tool that integrates the US Miltary Rated ratcheting tourniquet system directly into a high strength belt.  Now anyone  can have the comfort of knowning they carry a multi use survival system with them wherever they go.  

Built Tough - High quality material and construction meet rigirous safety and testing standards to ensure thy are able withstand the harsh environmnts. 

Trainable  - The Parabelt designed to be trained with until the user becomes comfortbale with the tourniquet application
system.   

Load Rated - The Parabelt comes with an high strength 18KN rated bucle system, and the entire belt is load rate at 4,000 lbs, making it an incredible rescue belt.  

APPLICATIONS:

  • Every Day Wear
  • Firefighter
  • Search & Rescue
  • EMS
  • Law Enforcement
  • First Responders
  • Military 
RevMedx PARABELT® Tourniquet Belt

RevMedx PARABELT® Tourniquet Belt

RevMedx PARABELT® Tourniquet Belt

RevMedx PARABELT® Tourniquet Belt

RevMedx PARABELT® Tourniquet Belt
Curso TECC España TACTICAL EMERGENCY CASUALTY CARE. TACMED Tactical Medicine

Combat Tourniquet One of Army’s Top 10 Inventions for ’05

            Combat Application Tourniquet (C-A-T)


Combat Tourniquet One of Army’s Top 10 Inventions for ’05

by  on  • 12:56 pm
Combat Application Tourniquet (C-A-T)

Combat Application Tourniquet (C-A-T)

A new design for a tourniquet for use in combat has brought the devices back into favor with Army surgeons.
The Combat Application Tourniquet was tested along with eight other tourniquets in 2004 at the U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research in San Antonio, Texas. The evaluation was prompted because many deploying Soldiers and units were purchasing tourniquets off the Internet, but the tourniquets’ effectiveness had not been determined. Once testing was complete, the institute’s researchers recommended the Combat Application Tourniquet be pushed to deployed troops to stop otherwise lethal blood loss.
“If USAISR (U.S. Army Institute of Surgical Research) hadn’t done the work, there still wouldn’t have been an effective tourniquet out there,” said Dr. Tom Walters of the institute that studies how to save the lives of Soldiers who are wounded in combat.
Up until that point, he added, the tourniquets that were available through the military’s supply system included a cravat-and-stick tourniquet that Soldiers were taught how to use in basic training and the strap-and-buckle tourniquet that dated back to the American Civil War. The latter “had always been known to be ineffective,” Walters said.
In the “tourniquet-off” held at the institute during the summer of 2004, 18 volunteers helped evaluate the nine tourniquets’ ability to cut off blood flow. When the results were in, the CAT, as well as two other tourniquets, came out on top. The CAT had a smaller learning curve than the others, so researchers recommended it for the Army. The Marine Corps has adopted it as well.


“Tourniquets are being used on almost every extremity injury, and they are saving lives,” said Holcomb, who was recently deployed as a surgeon at the 10th Combat Support Hospital in Iraq. “Tourniquets were rarely seen early in the war, and now it’s abnormal to see a severe extremity injury without a functional tourniquet in place. There is no pre-hospital device deployed in this war that has saved more lives than tourniquets.”
While it’s certainly come at a tremendous human cost, the Iraq war has shown us entire fields of technology where we’ve been lacking. Say what you will about technology that improves offensive potential, but innovations to keep soldiers and civilians alive are always good ideas.
More from ARNews
FlashbacksThe Special Operations Forces Tactical TourniquetArmy Develops Improved Tourniquet

Self-Affixing Tourniquet. Russian Firm Designs First Domestically-Produced Combat Tourniquet

A self-affixing tourniquet, designed for use by injured persons in circumstances and locations beyond the reach of assistance, was presented by Russian medical company Medplant in Moscow on Thursday. The company said the potentially life-saving tourniquet was designed with the military and police forces in mind.




Comparative characteristics of Tourniquets
Tourniquet douches
Tourniquet C.A.T.
Tourniquet MEDPLANT


Combat tourniquet, which enables the life-saving procedure to be performed single-handedly, was preformed by Russian medical engineering firm Medplant, according to media reports.




MOSCOW (Sputnik) — A new design for a combat tourniquet to stop blood flow in limbs following injuries on the battlefield has been unveiled by Russian medical engineering firm Medplant, media reported Monday.
The one-handed tourniquet enables the life-saving procedure to be performed single-handedly, the company’s tactical medical instructor told the Russian newspaper Izvestia.

elf-Affixing Tourniquet. Russian Firm Designs First Domestically-Produced Combat Tourniquet

The new tourniquets have been tested by the country’s elite police squads and by the Kirov Military Medical Academy in the extreme Antarctic climate. The tests revealed several advantages of the Russian design over the SOF and CAT versions, used by the US Army.
He pointed out that US tourniquets would unravel if not pulled until they are very tight, while the Russian model is provided with a row of security locks that allow the user to pause during the procedure.
A self-affixing tourniquet, designed for use by injured persons in circumstances and locations beyond the reach of assistance, was presented by Russian medical company Medplant in Moscow on Thursday. The company said the potentially life-saving tourniquet was designed with the military and police forces in mind.
elf-Affixing Tourniquet. Russian Firm Designs First Domestically-Produced Combat Tourniquet

"The tourniquet’s design enables a soldier to apply it single-handedly to an injured extremity. You only need to strap it on with the help of a hook-and-loop fastener and rotate the handle, providing pressure that stops the bleeding," he said.
self-affixing tourniquet
"Our tourniquets are more practical and easier to use in comparison to their western analogues," the instructor said.

elf-Affixing Tourniquet. Russian Firm Designs First Domestically-Produced Combat Tourniquet
Curso TECC España TACTICAL EMERGENCY CASUALTY CARE. TACMED Tactical Medicine