Curso Tactical Emergency Casualty Care

Curso Tactical Emergency Casualty Care
TECC-SEMES Andalucia

Facebook EMS SOLUTIONS INTERNATIONAL

domingo, 31 de julio de 2016

¿COMO AYUDAR A LOS NIÑOS A CONFRONTAR UNA CATASTROFE By FEMA y American Red Cross

¿COMO AYUDAR A LOS NIÑOS A CONFRONTAR UNA CATASTROFE  By FEMA y American Red Cross










Cómo ayudar a los niños a confrontar una catástrofe 
FEMA
American Red Cross
Enlace para bajar en pdf

Cortesía
EMS España / Emergency Medical Services en España
@EMSESP 
Follow me / INVITA A TUS AMIGOS A SEGUIRNOS
@drramonreyesdiaz 
https://www.facebook.com/drramonreyesdiaz

sábado, 30 de julio de 2016

Official Guide to Portable Oxygen Concentrators. by 1stClassMedical


Official Guide to Portable Oxygen Concentrators. by 1stClassMedical

Click here to download your Official Guide!


Cortesía
EMS España / Emergency Medical Services en España
@EMSESP 
Follow me / INVITA A TUS AMIGOS A SEGUIRNOS
@drramonreyesdiaz
https://www.facebook.com/drramonreyesdiaz

jueves, 28 de julio de 2016

PHTLS FOUNDER AND MEDICAL DIRECTOR Norman E. McSwain, Jr., MD, FACS. 1937-2015

"What have you done for the good of mankind lately?" 
¿Qué has hecho por el bien de la humanidad últimamente?
Dr. Norman McSwain 1937-2015


Norman E. McSwain, Jr., MD, FACS
1937-2015

Revered trauma physician Dr. Norman McSwain dies at 78
Dr. Norman McSwain, a New Orleans physician revered for establishing New Orleans' emergency medical services system, died Tuesday (July 28), according to the New Orleans Police Department. He was 78.
He had been hospitalized in critical condition at Tulane University Medical Center after suffering a "cerebral bleed" July 17, according to a report in the Journal of Emergency Medical Services.McSwain's life will be remembered for the impact he made on emergency trauma care. As a member of the American College of Surgeons' Committee on Trauma, he helped develop the Advanced Trauma Life Support and the Pre-Hospital Trauma Life Support programs. His methods are widely regarded as the standard for trauma care outside hospitals.
His practices have been taught to more than 500,000 people in 45 countries. He was also the only physician in the American College of Surgeons' history to achieve all five major trauma awards.
McSwain served as director of trauma for the Spirit of Charity Trauma Center at the Interim LSU Hospital was a surgery professor at Tulane's School of Medicine. He also served as a consulting medical director for the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival for almost 30 years.
Originally from Alabama, McSwain is credited for the creation of emergency medical service programs in New Orleans and Kansas.
His programs emphasized immediate medical services to treat victims of traffic crashes, gunshots, stabbings and other life-threatening injuries before arriving at a hospital.
McSwain earned his medical degree from the University of Alabama before joining the faculty at the University of Kansas, according his biography on Tulane's website.
He was later drawn to New Orleans because he believed Charity Hospital to be "one of the three most important trauma centers in the United States."
McSwain spent his time in New Orleans as he did in Kansas—he helped lift Interim LSU Hospital to become a Level I trauma center and started training police in basic emergency medical and paramedic procedures.
He made a point to care for severely injured police officers in his last 30 years.
McSwain additionally wrote or revised 25 textbooks and made more than 800 presentations of emergency trauma care in all 50 states, all Canadian provinces and most of Europe and South America.

Norman E. McSwain, Jr., MD, FACS
PHTLS Medical Director
Norman E. McSwain, Jr., MD, FACS
PHTLS Medical Director
Email: norman.mcswain@tulane.edu
Norman E. McSwain, Jr., MD, FACS, attended The University of The South in Sewanee, Tenn., and then returned to his birthplace of Alabama to learn medicine under Dr. Tinsley Harrison (of Harrison’s Textbook of Medicine fame) and surgery from Dr. Champ Lyons at the University of Alabama School of Medicine. After completing two years of surgical training at Bowman-Gray School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, N.C., McSwain then joined the Air Force. There, he performed more than a thousand surgical procedures. After his service, he went to Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta to finish his initial education as a surgeon. Over the next three years, he learned more about true patient care as a partner in private practice with Dr. Harrison 
Rogers in Atlanta before he joined the clinical and academic faculty at the University of Kansas in Kansas City. While there, he was given the responsibility of EMS education and system development for the State of Kansas. When he was recruited four years later to Tulane University School of Medicine, Department of Surgery, and Charity Hospital, New Orleans, he left behind 90 percent of the population of Kansas covered  by paramedic quality care within ten minutes of home, and one out of every 500 Kansans (including the entire Kansas Highway Patrol) trained as an EMT-Basic.  Serving as academic and clinical faculty at Tulane, McSwain’s main interest was in pre-hospital patient care through Charity Hospital, considered to be one of the three most important trauma centers in the U.S. at the time. Through his work there, he was recruited by the City of New Orleans to develop an EMS system for the city. He initiated both the EMT-Basic and EMT-Paramedic training within the New Orleans Police Department as well as a citywide EMS system.  McSwain also was recruited to the American College of Surgeons Committee on Trauma to assist in the development of the Advanced Trauma Life Support program. He worked with the ACS/COT and NAEMT to develop the PHTLS program.  Today, PHTLS has trained over half a million people in 45 countries.  It is considered to be the world standard for pre-hospital trauma care. He has worked with the military and the Department of Defense to develop the Tactical Combat Casualty Care program for military medics. For the past 30 years, he has provided care to severely injured police officers at Charity Hospital and has written or revised more than 25 textbooks, published more than 360 articles and traveled throughout the world giving 800 presentations. McSwain has lectured in each of the U.S.’s 50 states and in all of Canada’s provinces, most of the countries in Europe and in Central America,
and in the upper part of South America, as well as in Japan, China, Australia, and New Zealand.


Video http://youtu.be/8q92R-hSjcI


www.phtls.org 


PHTLS PreHospital Trauma Life Support

DR. NORMAN MCSWAIN, FOUNDER OF NAEMT'S PHTLS PROGRAM, HAS DIED

Jul 28, 2015


We are very saddened to report that Dr. Norman McSwain passed away today in his home in New Orleans. Internationally renowned and respected for his pioneering work in trauma care, Dr. McSwain founded NAEMT’s Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS) program 30 years ago, and is recognized by our association as the father of NAEMT education.
Norman McSwain
In addition to his prestigious career as a trauma surgeon, Dr. McSwain was a certified paramedic. He worked tirelessly throughout his career to ensure that EMS practitioners, both in the civilian and military sectors, received the highest quality education to enable them to provide the best care to their patients. He is admired and beloved by the EMS community across our country, as well across the globe, who have been impacted by his vision and passion for excellence in patient care.

He will be missed by the thousands of people whose lives he touched, but he will live on in the hearts and minds of his family, friends, colleagues, students and patients. We send prayers to his family and wish them strength and peace in the coming days.

Read more about Dr. McSwain's prestigious career:

http://tulane.edu/som/departments/surgery/faculty-staff/upload/bio-080608-short-1.pdf

http://www.emsmuseum.org/virtual-museum/curriculum/articles/398251-1971-Norman-McSwain-MD

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/09/us/nationalspecial/a-surgeon-caught-up-in-the-flooding-tells-of-a-week-of-chaos-peril-and-heroism.html

http://neworleanscitybusiness.com/blog/tag/dr-norman-mcswain/

http://www.nbcnews.com/id/9270986/ns/health/t/doctors-medical-workers-are-katrinas-heroes/#.VbgV4bfZu7w

http://www.emsmuseum.org/virtual-museum/timeline/articles/398156-EMT-Journal-NAEMT-1977

CC 2012 Trauma Dinner - Order of Military Merit award DSC_0819CC NEWS
The 2012 Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons (ACS)



2015 Hartford Consensus III




Announcements:


http://www.wdsu.com/news/local-news/new-orleans/trauma-medicine-pioneer-dr-norman-mcswain-dies/34405790


http://www.nola.com/health/index.ssf/2015/07/revered_trauma_physician_dr_no.html

Pictogramas de peligro (símbolos de peligro)

Pictogramas de Peligro
Tóxico

Clasificación: La inhalación y la ingestión o absorción cutánea en pequeña cantidad, pueden conducir a daños para la salud de magnitud considerable, eventualmente con consecuencias mortales. 

Precaución: evitar cualquier contacto con el cuerpo humano. En caso de malestar consultar inmediatamente al médico. En caso de manipulación de estas sustancias deben establecerse procedimientos especiales! 


Enlace para más simbolos
Articulo relacionado en 20minutos.es

Cortesía
EMS España / Emergency Medical Services en España
@EMSESP 
Follow me / INVITA A TUS AMIGOS A SEGUIRNOS
@drramonreyesdiaz
https://www.facebook.com/drramonreyesdiaz



Publicado por
DR. RAMON REYES DIAZ, MD, DMO, EMT
Skype drtolete
19543249506

Emergency Responders Should Carry Blood Products. UK

Emergency Responders Should Carry Blood Products


Study suggests that emergency medical responders should carry blood products to improve survival of trauma patients


By HospiMedica International staff writers

Posted on 27 Sep 2015

A new study suggests that emergency first responders ought to carry blood products in order to significantly improve trauma patients’ chances of survival. 

Researchers at the UK Defense Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl; Porton Down, United Kingdom), Queen Mary, University of London (United Kingdom), and the Royal Center for Defense Medicine (RCDM; Birmingham, United Kingdom) conducted a study to compare the potential impact of emergency resuscitation using combined packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma (PRBCs:FFP) at a 1:1 ratio; PRBCs alone; or standard of care 0.9% saline during severe injury. 

To do so, 24 terminally anesthetized pigs received a controlled soft tissue injury and controlled hemorrhage of 35% of their blood volume, followed by a 30 minute shock phase. The animals were then allocated randomly to three treatment groups during a simulated prehospital evacuation phase. The first group were allocated to hypotensive resuscitation using 0.9% saline, the second to PRBCs:FFP, and the third to PRBCs alone. Following this phase, in-hospital resuscitation to a normotensive systolic blood pressure target of 110 mmHg using PRBCs:FFP was performed in all three groups. 

The results showed that considerable coagulopathy developed in the first group, which persisted for 60–90 minutes into the in-hospital phase. The coagulopathy was significantly reduced in groups 2 and 3, but not significantly different from each other. Finally, the volumes of resuscitation fluid required was significantly greater in group 1, compared with groups 2 and 3; this difference was principally due to the greater volume of saline used in group 1. The study was published in the August 2015 issue of Shock.

“Badly injured people often lose the ability to form a blood clot properly, just when they need it most,” said senior author Emrys Kirkman, MD, principal scientist at Dstl. “Our research provides the scientific foundation for the premise that giving blood products before seriously injured patients reach hospital could help save lives, as it improves the ability to form blood clots.”

In 2008 the medical evacuation response team in Afghanistan started carrying blood products to injured personnel on the frontline, thanks to the development of special refrigeration units on the Chinook helicopters. The emergency care procedure, among other measures, has been credited with saving a number of lives in Afghanistan. It could also have an impact for civilian first responders,, but currently only a few air ambulance services in the UK have the mandate, staff, and systems required to carry blood products.


Phi Med 2 Flight Nurse, Shannon Miller, prepares to administer blood to a critical patient in Hemorrhagic Shock.




http://www.hospimedica.com/critical_care/articles/294760564/emergency_responders_should_carry_blood_products.html


Related Links:

UK Defense Science and Technology Laboratory
Queen Mary, University of London
Royal Center for Defense Medicine



1er SIMPOSIUM INTERNACIONAL DE TRAUMA 2015
By Comité de Trauma Colegio Dominicano de Cirujanos
http://goo.gl/j8AVGq
Cortesía

EMS España / Emergency Medical Services en España

Follow me / INVITA A TUS AMIGOS A SEGUIRNOS
https://www.facebook.com/drramonreyesdiaz

EN URGENCIAS LA SEGURIDAD DEL PACIENTE ESTA EN NUESTRAS MANOS SEMES-Fundacion MAPFRE. PDF

EN URGENCIAS LA SEGURIDAD DEL PACIENTE ESTA EN NUESTRAS MANOS
SEMES-Fundacion MAPFRE


Cortesía
EMS España / Emergency Medical Services en España
@EMSESP
Follow me / INVITA A TUS AMIGOS A SEGUIRNOS
@drramonreyesdiaz
https://www.facebook.com/drramonreyesdiaz

EN URGENCIAS LA SEGURIDAD DEL PACIENTE ESTA EN NUESTRAS MANOS
SEMES-Fundacion MAPFRE



EN URGENCIAS LA SEGURIDAD DEL PACIENTE ESTA EN NUESTRAS MANOS
SEMES-Fundacion MAPFRE


EN URGENCIAS LA SEGURIDAD DEL PACIENTE ESTA EN NUESTRAS MANOS
SEMES-Fundacion MAPFRE



EN URGENCIAS LA SEGURIDAD DEL PACIENTE ESTA EN NUESTRAS MANOS
SEMES-Fundacion MAPFRE





EN URGENCIAS LA SEGURIDAD DEL PACIENTE ESTA EN NUESTRAS MANOS
SEMES-Fundacion MAPFRE


EN URGENCIAS LA SEGURIDAD DEL PACIENTE ESTA EN NUESTRAS MANOS
SEMES-Fundacion MAPFRE



EN URGENCIAS LA SEGURIDAD DEL PACIENTE ESTA EN NUESTRAS MANOS
SEMES-Fundacion MAPFRE


Cortesía
EMS España / Emergency Medical Services en España
@EMSESP
Follow me / INVITA A TUS AMIGOS A SEGUIRNOS
@drramonreyesdiaz
https://www.facebook.com/drramonreyesdiaz

 Bajar PDF en el enlace http://portalsemes.org/semesdivulgacion/doc/seguridad-del-paciente.pdf

miércoles, 27 de julio de 2016

Búsqueda y Rescate en Estructuras Colapsadas. Manual de Campo. USAID

Búsqueda y Rescate en Estructuras Colapsadas. Manual de Campo. USAID
Enlace para bajar PDF gratis 

Cortesía
EMS España / Emergency Medical Services en España
@EMSESP
Follow me / INVITA A TUS AMIGOS A SEGUIRNOS
@drramonreyesdiaz 
https://www.facebook.com/drramonreyesdiaz

lunes, 25 de julio de 2016

Atención prehospitalaria de pacientes embarazadas: revisión y recomendaciones para el entrenamiento


Atención prehospitalaria de pacientes embarazadas: revisión y recomendaciones para el entrenamiento  


Atención prehospitalaria de pacientes embarazadas: revisión y recomendaciones para el entrenamiento

El helicóptero del servicio médico de emergencias de Sidney provee traslado crítico pre- e inter-hospitalarios medicalizados. Los autores revisaron la casuística obstétrica de dicho servicio en cuanto al diagnóstico primario y a las intervenciones para mejorar el entrenamiento médico para estos casos.
Se recuperaron fichas correspondientes a un periodo de cuatro años para identificar las palabras clave asociadas con embarazo o complicaciones obstétricas.
De los 66 casos de embarazo o puerperio:
  • 38 fueron transportadas por carretera y 28 por aire.
  • 33 tenían complicaciones obstétricas y 33 condiciones médicas no obstétricas.
  • 61 pacientes requirieron ventilación mecánica, 23 de las cuales fueron intubadas por el médico rescatista antes del transporte.
  • 33 pacientes requirieron apoyo circulatorio vasoactivo y se colocó un acceso arterial y/o venoso central en 48 y 30 pacientes, respectivamente.
  • La única intervención obstétrica llevada a cabo por el médico rescatista fue terapia intravenosa tocolítica (dos casos) y un caso de histerotomía de resucitación (cesárea peri-mortem).
Los autores concluyeron que la mitad de las pacientes peri-parto en dicho servicio de transporte de cuidados intensivos fueron trasladadas por diagnósticos no obstétricos. Las intervenciones obstétricas realizadas por los médicos de rescate fueron raras, pero la histerotomía de resucitación podría llegar a ser necesaria. La mayoría de las intervenciones fueron procedimientos generales de cuidados intensivos. Un entrenamiento exhaustivo en emergencias obstétricas no reflejaría las necesidades de aprendizaje de los médicos rescatistas en servicios como el mencionado. Los recursos educativos deberían priorizar el cuidado crítico general de la mujer embarazada, más que los procedimientos obstétricos específicos.
Fuente: http://reanimacion.net/atencion-prehospitalaria-de-pacientes-embarazadas-revision-y-recomendaciones-para-el-entrenamiento-2/

Cortesía
EMS España / Emergency Medical Services en España 
@EMSESP
Follow me / INVITA A TUS AMIGOS A SEGUIRNOS
https://www.facebook.com/drramonreyesdia

domingo, 24 de julio de 2016

¿Cuál es el animal más mortífero para la especie humana?

¿Cuál es el animal más peligroso para la especie humana? ¿El tiburón? ¿La serpiente? ¿La araña? ¿Es lobo? ¿Quizá el propio Homo Sapiens? Una interesante infografía difundida por Bill Gates nos da la respuesta.
"La respuesta depende de cómo uno defina el peligro. Personalmente, tengo una ligera idea sobre ello desde la primera vez que vi Jaws [Tiburón, de Steven Spielberg]. Pero si para definir el potencial aniquilador de un animal se tiene en cuenta cuánta gente muere cada año por su ataque, la respuesta está clara: es el mosquito", aclara Bill Gates.
"Cuando se trata de matar humanos, el mosquito no tiene parangón". Tan sólo le siguen, y de lejos, las personas, cuya capacidad aniquiladora con los de su propia especie es de sobra cocida.
Así comienza Bill Gates un post en su blog de la Fundación Bill & Melinda Gates que da cuenta de hasta qué punto este animal aparentemente insignificante puede ser devastador.¿Por qué es tan peligroso?"A pesar de su inocente nombre [mosquito: mosca pequeña], este insecto es portador de las enfermedades más letales. La peor de ellas es la malaria, que mata a más de 600.000 personas cada año e incapacita a 200 millones de personas cada día durante días".
Es una amenaza para la mitad de la población mundial y cada año motiva pérdidas de miles de millones de dólares en productividad, y eso sin tener en cuenta otras de las temibles enfermedades transmitidas por los mosquitos como el dengue, la fiebre amarilla o la encefalitis.
Hay descritas más de 2.500 especies de mosquitos, que viven en todas las regiones del mundo, salvo la Antártida. Su tasa de éxito en la época de reproducción, la más favorable para su expansión, supera con creces a cualquier otro animal en el mundo, salvo las termitas y las hormigas, cuenta Bill Gates en su blog.
"Durante la construcción del Canal de Panamá fueron responsables de decenas de miles de muertes", revela el fundador de Microsoft. Y sus perniciosos efectos tienen más vertientes. Determina los patrones de población mundial a gran escala: en muchas zonas endémicas, la malaria hace que grandes masas de poblaciones tiendan a vivir y trasladarse tierra adentro, lejos de la costa, donde el clima es más favorable para su expansión.La criatura más mortal no tiene caché"Considerando este impacto", prosigue Bill Gates, "lo normal sería que les prestáramos más atención. Los tiburones acaban con la vida de menos de una docena de personas cada año en Estados Unidos, pero se les dedica una media de una semana al año en la televisión. Sin embargo, no hay ningún programa dedicado al mosquito, cuya capacidad mortal es 50.000 veces mayor. O al menos, yo nunca he oído hablar de él", apostilla Bill Gates.
Para suplir esta carencia, la Fundación Bill y Melinda Gates ha puesto en marcha la campaña promocional La semana del mosquito con el fin de alertar sobre esta "criatura mortal".
Como parte de la iniciativa, la institución divulga en internet y en los medios de comunicación una serie de documentales sobre la biología de los mecanismos de transmisión de las enfermedades que propaga y da a conocer proyectos de cooperación en los que Bill Gates ha participado personalmente.Tus pesadillas con tiburones serán cuentos para dormirLos Gates nos cuentan cómo han aprendido de las más inusuales y fascinantes experiencias: las ingeniosas soluciones de un pueblo para evitar la picadura potencialmente mortal; la heroica lucha de científicos y sanitarios al pie del cañón... muchas y distintas aproximaciones para combatir la malaria, en la mayoría de las ocasiones, desconocidas para el gran público.
Y además, la institución ha producido una película cuyo cartel promocional es digno de la mejor serie B: 'Mosquito: la picadura más minúscula es la más mortal'. "Conseguirá que tus pesadillas con tiburones sean como cuentos infantiles para dormir".
"No puedo prometer que el Anopheles gambiae sea tan fascinante como el tiburón martillo o el tiburón blanco. Pero quizás te pueda revelar una nueva dimensión de estos maestros alados del caos", concluye Bill Gates.

Fuente: http://www.expansion.com/2014/04/30/entorno/1398853124.html

Cortesía
EMS España / Emergency Medical Services en España 
@EMSESP


Follow me / INVITA A TUS AMIGOS A SEGUIRNOS
https://www.facebook.com/drramonreyesdiaz