Facebook Dr. Ramon Reyes Diaz, MD

DESFIBRILADORES TELEFUNKEN

DESFIBRILADORES TELEFUNKEN
DISTRIBUIDORES AUTORIZADOS

miércoles, 11 de noviembre de 2015

EMS RESCUE ROBOT

Tokyo Fire Department’s Robocue. (C)Tokyo Fire Department

Only in japan would firefighters have a robot to help with rescues. The robot can be used as a rescue robot for people who are unconscious from a fire or to pickup casualties.
Read more at http://www.uberreview.com/2007/03/robo-rescue-scooping-people-out-of-harms-way.htm#zFuAbrC2u8lkI1rE.99 


Tokyo Fire Department’s Robocue. (C)Tokyo Fire Department


Tokyo Fire Department’s Robocue. (C)Tokyo Fire Department

Rescue Robots at the Cutting EdgeThe most advanced rescue robot in Japan at the moment is Quince, unveiled in April 2010 by the Chiba Institute of Technology, Tohoku University, and IRS. Quince consists of a main body incorporating two wide crawler belts, and four free-moving pairs of wheels that extend like arms from the corners. Making full use of these body parts, the robot adeptly maneuvers its way around all kinds of terrain, from stairs to rubble. Resistant to dust and water, Quince is also able to rinse off quickly any dangerous polluting chemicals it encounters, making it a highly durable and practical robot. Quince is set to be loaned out to fire departments in Chiba and Kobe. Japanese rescue robots are quickly moving from the realm of research to the front line of disaster rescue operations.
The main purpose of the robots introduced above is information gathering, but the Tokyo Fire Department is also spearheading efforts to develop life-saving robots. One example is a remote-controlled rescue robot nicknamed Robocue, which debuted in 2009. Robocue runs on caterpillar treads and can pull a person into its body using a manipulator arm and conveyor belt. With a smaller and lighter body than its predecessors and added remote control, Robocue promises improved mobility and utility in disaster sites. (September 2010)